CARRIER CLASH:
The Invasion of Guadalcanal and the Battle of the Eastern Solomons, August 1942


by Eric Hammel


- Newly discovered Japanese records provide a fresh appraisal of this little-known battle. Carrier Clash is an exciting, fact-filled narrative that takes the reader into the air with brave U.S. Navy pilots as they defend their ships against incoming Japanese bombers, into the cockpits of U.S. Navy dive-bombers as they dive on the light carrier Ryujo, and into firey compartments as the crew of the damaged USS Enterprise battles to keep their bomb-battered ship afloat.

Critical Acclaim for Carrier Clash: The Invasion of Guadalcanal and the Battle of the Eastern Solomons, August 1942:

The Bookwatch says: Carrier Clash takes the reader into the air with brave U.S. Navy pilots . . . [It] is an important contribution to the military history of World war II’s battle for control of the Pacific.

The Book World says: Carrier Clash is a stark revelation of a complex encounter.

Military Magazine says: Mr. Hammel presents the entire battle in a clear, easy-to-follow manner while interjecting interesting views of the [Battle of the Eastern Solomons] as seen by the participants on both sides.

Military Review says: The book is loaded with great charts (maps), order of battle, and other hard to find details. Although Hammel describes the land and surface ship battles, his forte is his vivid descriptions of the aerial dogfights during the [Guadalcanal] invasion and the Battle of the Eastern Solomons.

Canadian Military History says: Eric Hammel continues his tradition of exciting, well crafted books on the Pacific War with this account of the carrier battles that accompanied the American landings on Guadalcanal
. . . There is no denying that this is a cracking good read and an excellent companion to Hammel’s other books on the Guadalcanal Campaign.

Sea Power says: Acclaimed military historian Eric Hammel presents a landmark history of the Battle of the Eastern Solomons . . . Drawing on newly declassified information from U.S. and Japanese sources, and on numerous other archival sources, Hammel brings a fresh perspective to the outcome of the war as a whole. . . . [He] describes with precision and insight the key events in the Guadalcanal/Eastern Solomons campaigns, the strategic implications of the battle, and the impact on the overall battle plans of both adversaries.